Summer Reading Recommendations

If you have been following my book reviews for quite some time now then you know it’s been awhile since I last posted one of these. While I hate to admit it, yes, I have been slacking on my New Year’s resolution to read a new book every week. Sometimes life simply gets in the way and that is ok.

I think many people become discouraged the moment they realize they break a goal that they promised themselves they’d stick to. Well, here I am telling you that it’s ok to break goals, but only as long as you are still attempting to stick with them. Life has definitely caught up with me the last few months- from moving from London back to New York, to starting a new job, to taking on new students- it has been hectic.

summer reading list

Lately I have been making sure to take at least 30 minutes to read a chapter or two of my book. It has quickly become an easy way to unwind and relax after a long day of working. Not only am I learning and bettering my mind, but I am deconnecting from my phone and the business of life itself.

option b summer reading

Option B by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant-

Sheryl Sandberg is one of my favorite authors for her ability to relate each topic she writes about to every type of reader. I am a huge fan of her first book, “Lean In”, as well as this book, which is her newest. If you are going through a hard time in your life, this book will make you appreciate your life and help you to live every moment to its fullest. It truly gave me a different perspective on the hardships I have gone through and how to make the best out of it. I highly recommend this book to anyone, whether you are going through a tough time or not.

Birth of a Theorem by Cedric Villani-

I had to include a fail in this reading list because, honestly, who enjoys every single book they read? Being an avid math lover and “amateur mathematician”, I was very excited to read about the process of creating a new mathematical theorem and having it be accepted into the world. However, this book was way out of my league. The first chapter in I felt as if I was reading gibberish. Therefore, unless you have a PhD in Mathematics, steer clear of this book.

Lolita summer reading

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov-

After hearing Lana Del Rey sing hey, Lolita, hey way too many times without quite understanding the reference, I decided to give in and read this classic. While the book was quite disturbing, it was an interesting view point to read up on. If you have a fascination with the term nymphet and where it comes from, or if just want to read a classic piece of literature, give it a try.

The Millstone by Margaret Drabble-

Like many books I choose to read, the cover of this one is what attracted me to this particular book. It was simply too pretty to pass up on having it displayed on my future New York City apartment bookcase. The plot explains the changing life of a single woman in 1960s London who becomes pregnant after a one-night stand. The book walks through her thoughts on her pregnancy and future child and how her life changes after having the baby. I really enjoyed a look inside the mind of an independent woman who goes through a serious life change like having a child.

summer reading list

If you are looking for some more book recommendations be sure to check out March’s Reads, February’s Reads, and January’s Reads. With the end of my summer internship also comes a week long summer vacation and lots of hours spent reading on the beach; so be sure to look out for lots more book reviews coming soon!

March’s Reads

As I mentioned last month, I have been on a classical literature kick, something very unusual for me. I think the romance and history of London is getting to my head and changing my book preferences! That being said, here are reviews of some classics that have now become favorites of mine. However, towards the end of the month, I went back to my old ways and picked up a book on economics. Now that class is over for me I needed a source for a daily dose of knowledge!

Goodbye to Berlin by Christopher Isherwood-

If you read my post about the books I read last month then you know I absolutely adored “Madonna in a Fur Coat” (and have been recommending it to everyone that asks for a book suggestion). When I finished reading it and returned to Daunt Books looking for my next few books to read, I asked a worker for books similar to it. She recommend me this book as well as the next one, “Marie”.

The Daunt Books employee told me that this book would give me a deeper insight into the burlesque clubs and war scene of 1930s Berlin that “Madonna in a Fur Coat” touched on briefly; and that it did. The characters in both novels are very similar, which is why I enjoyed this so much. While this classic more so introduces you to an array of intricate characters rather than a dramatic plot, I found it very captivating. If you enjoy Berlin’s history and characters with many different layers, give this one a read.

Marie by Madeleine Bourdouxhe-

This book was recommended to me because the main character, Marie, has a very similar attitude to ___ in “Madonna and a Fur Coat”. Both are women trapped in a lifestyle they don’t necessarily wish to be living. They both possess strong thoughts on men and their particular relationship with them. In this book, Marie struggles between the deep love she has for her husband and her desire to be her own person. Her actions say one thing and her thoughts say another.

Marie Madeleine Bourdouxhe review

Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates-

Another classic, this novel tells the story of a couple living together in the suburbs of New York. Unlike most couples in the suburbs, Frank and Gloria never wished to live there or to have a family. They often fight with one another over the plans for the future and their children, both hoping not to sink into the comforts of living a “perfectly normal” life. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel because I can personally relate to the trap that suburbia can put on one’s ambitions. Afterall, I am a girl who loves the city!

Zero to One by Peter Thiel-

This book is quite unlike the others from the month of March. “Zero to One” discusses the evolution of technology and the important roles entrepreneurs play in this future. It analyzes the aspects that make certain companies successful and others unsuccessful. If you have a love for technology, economics or entrepreneurship, you will love this. I personally liked it because its points contradicted the points made by some of my favorite authors in some of my favorite books, one of those authors being Malcolm Gladwell. I always find it interesting when authors argue against the points made by well-known economists.

march 2017 book reviews

If you have any recommendations on books you think I should read, please leave them below! Check out January’s Reads, February’s Readsand be sure to look out for April’s Reads, coming soon.

Hidden Gem of London: Daunt Books

Literature has been a major theme of my new year. After all, I did set a resolution to read a new book each week, which I will be filling you in on at the end of each month. Naturally, I am always looking for a new book to pick up and dive into next. 52 books is a lot of books! Can you even name that many books you have read over the course of your life? I’m not sure I even can.

bookshop6

I stumbled upon Daunt Books one day after venturing off of Marylebone Road where my University’s campus is situated. The surrounding area is bustling with small cafes, boutique shops, and, of course, this fabulous book store.

Best London Bookshop

The first thing I was attracted to was the large window in the back of the store, lined on both sides by upstairs railings. In this room, each bookcase showcases a different country and travel guides to visiting that country. The perfect shelves to browse while planning a European adventure! I must say, the atmosphere is truly unlike any Barnes and Nobles at home (sorry!).

Best London Bookshop

Aside from the unique beauty of the store, each book itself is a true work of art. I was able to find some of my favorite books lining the shelf, all of which had cover art that I had never seen before (Michael Lewis’s books included). Despite popular opinion, I am a firm believer of judging a book by its cover. The outside is an art entirely separate from the words inside the pages, and it deserves to be treated that way.

As an art and book lover, I highly recommend stopping in this shop while venturing through the neighborhood of Marylebone in London. Not only can you find an endless amount of inspiring and well-written literature but also individual works of art in the form of cover pages.

Discover more gems of London with me by following me on here, InstagramTwitter, and Facebook.