First Reads of 2018

How many of you set a New Year’s resolution to read more? In my opinion, this is one of the best resolutions you can make. Reading can be educational, teaching you new things every time you pick up a book, or it can be an escape from the stress of everyday life.

If you’ve been reading my blog for awhile then you may remember that I set a goal in 2017 to read a new book each week. While this may have only lasted a few months, I became more aware of how I was spending my free time. I realized that I could be putting the time I spend on my phone or watching Netflix to much better use. That being said, I modified my resolution for 2018 to be to read before bed every night instead of falling sleep to Netflix or Youtube. Not only will this help me better allocate my time to read, but it will improve my quality of sleep. I am excited to see where this resolution takes me.

Here is what I read during the first month of the year:

the psychopath test book review

The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson-

I am a sucker for a good read on psychopaths. That definitely sounds like something I shouldn’t admit to, but it is strangely fascinating. In this book, Ronson walks through a particular mystery that is brought to him by a professor in London. In the process of uncovering this mystery he becomes fixated on the idea of “madness”. He educates the reader on different studies conducted, people he meets, and psychologists that have studied this phenomenon. Overall, I enjoyed the way Ronson weaved a personal story into the educational material on the topic.

z: a novel of zelda fitzgerald

Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald by Therese Anne Fowler-

I could not put this book down. Seriously. If you love F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novels and his romantic word choice, you will equally love this novel. It tells the story of Zelda Fitzgerald’s life with Scott and how it slowly fell apart. Fowler does an ingenious job at intertwining fact with fiction, basing her story off of actual recorded events in the couple’s life. I particularly enjoyed learning about society’s expectations of housewives during this time period.

Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk by Kathleen Rooney-

I saw this book listed on Daunt Books’ website and was instantly attracted to the black and gold cover. I knew I needed to read it. If you are just as obsessed with New York City as I am, then this is a must-read. Told from the perspective of Lillian Boxfish, she walks the reader through her life in the city and the rich memories she has made there. She recounts how the city has changed during the 60 years that she has lived there.  While telling about the city and its wonderful charm, the novel also discusses the challenges faced by Boxfish as a successful working woman during the 1940s.

Incognito book review

Incognito by David Eagleman-

If you enjoy Malcolm Gladwell or Daniel Kahneman books, then you should add this to your reading list. “Incognito” looks at the unconscious aspects of the brain and how it controls decisions we make and actions we take. It really makes you question why you do the things you do. Eagleman describes different conditions caused by damage to these areas of the brain and how those who have them are completely unaware of them.

Leave a comment below telling me what you are currently reading. I would love to hear! Also, follow me on Instagram to see what I am reading right now.


February’s Reads

As you will see, I really branched out from my typical genre of books in the month of February. I have discovered an appreciation for both classic works of literature as well as romances set in the 1920s and 1930s. These books were so captivating that I finished most of them in a matter of a day or two.

Trainwreck: The Women We Love to Hate, Mock, and Fear… And Why by Sady Doyle-

This book analyzes popular female “trainwrecks”, such as Amy Winehouse and Britney Spears, and questions why they are given this label. Doyle discusses how society is the reason for these women’s breakdowns and how we can stop this. She questions why men are idolized for the same actions that women are called crazy for. If you enjoy feminist or thought-provoking literature, give this one a read!

Book Review

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi-

I’m sure many of you have heard lots of reviews about this book. It has become increasingly popular, and for good reason. It accounts the life of a neurosurgeon who falls ill with cancer, taking you through his thoughts of life and death. I believe everyone should read books like this because they give you a deeper appreciation for what really matters. Kalanithi struggles between his illness overcoming him and his love for surgery, which is such a powerful message. Be prepared to cry!

When Breath Becomes Air review

Madonna in a Fur Coat by Sabahattin Ali-

This book was being displayed as a featured book in Daunt Books one day, so naturally I decided to pick it up. This bookstore always gives the best recommendations and has books with the prettiest covers. I’m not gonna lie, the cover is what really got me… and the sales lady’s endless praise for it, too. This book is not a typical read for me, being that I usually head towards business or psychology books, but I quickly fell in love with it. It follows a Turkish man who finds himself in Berlin, captivated by a beautiful woman in a painting. I won’t ruin the magic of the book but the characters do end up meeting. Maria, this woman in the painting, is a character I found a lot of myself within, which is probably why I am so fascinated with her. Her strong, complex character is reason enough to read this novel.

Madonna in a Fur Coat

The Beautiful and Damned by F. Scott Fitzgerald-

A literary classic, I have been yearning to read this novel for awhile now. When I found it for only a few pounds in a bookstore in Old Street station, I knew it was finally time to read it. The first part consisted of the most magical, captivating pages. This part discussed Anthony’s fascination with Gloria and her youthful, free spirit. I have developed a deep love for the character of Gloria in her younger years. The rest of the novel follows the love story of these two characters and the changes in their lives relative to their own fortunes. I personally love the way Fitzgerald writes; there is something so poetic about his descriptions of people and events.

If you have any recommendations on books you think I should read, please leave them below! Check out January’s Reads and be sure to look out for March’s Reads, coming soon.