Summer Reading Recommendations

If you have been following my book reviews for quite some time now then you know it’s been awhile since I last posted one of these. While I hate to admit it, yes, I have been slacking on my New Year’s resolution to read a new book every week. Sometimes life simply gets in the way and that is ok.

I think many people become discouraged the moment they realize they break a goal that they promised themselves they’d stick to. Well, here I am telling you that it’s ok to break goals, but only as long as you are still attempting to stick with them. Life has definitely caught up with me the last few months- from moving from London back to New York, to starting a new job, to taking on new students- it has been hectic.

summer reading list

Lately I have been making sure to take at least 30 minutes to read a chapter or two of my book. It has quickly become an easy way to unwind and relax after a long day of working. Not only am I learning and bettering my mind, but I am deconnecting from my phone and the business of life itself.

option b summer reading

Option B by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant-

Sheryl Sandberg is one of my favorite authors for her ability to relate each topic she writes about to every type of reader. I am a huge fan of her first book, “Lean In”, as well as this book, which is her newest. If you are going through a hard time in your life, this book will make you appreciate your life and help you to live every moment to its fullest. It truly gave me a different perspective on the hardships I have gone through and how to make the best out of it. I highly recommend this book to anyone, whether you are going through a tough time or not.

Birth of a Theorem by Cedric Villani-

I had to include a fail in this reading list because, honestly, who enjoys every single book they read? Being an avid math lover and “amateur mathematician”, I was very excited to read about the process of creating a new mathematical theorem and having it be accepted into the world. However, this book was way out of my league. The first chapter in I felt as if I was reading gibberish. Therefore, unless you have a PhD in Mathematics, steer clear of this book.

Lolita summer reading

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov-

After hearing Lana Del Rey sing hey, Lolita, hey way too many times without quite understanding the reference, I decided to give in and read this classic. While the book was quite disturbing, it was an interesting view point to read up on. If you have a fascination with the term nymphet and where it comes from, or if just want to read a classic piece of literature, give it a try.

The Millstone by Margaret Drabble-

Like many books I choose to read, the cover of this one is what attracted me to this particular book. It was simply too pretty to pass up on having it displayed on my future New York City apartment bookcase. The plot explains the changing life of a single woman in 1960s London who becomes pregnant after a one-night stand. The book walks through her thoughts on her pregnancy and future child and how her life changes after having the baby. I really enjoyed a look inside the mind of an independent woman who goes through a serious life change like having a child.

summer reading list

If you are looking for some more book recommendations be sure to check out March’s Reads, February’s Reads, and January’s Reads. With the end of my summer internship also comes a week long summer vacation and lots of hours spent reading on the beach; so be sure to look out for lots more book reviews coming soon!

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January’s Reads

I know, I know. This post is a month delayed… but I promise, I have been keeping true to my New Year’s Resolution! I have happily read a new book every week and am learning something new every day. Here is what I read during the month of January:

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St. Marks is Dead by Aba Calhoun-

We all know I love New York City; that is no secret. As Carry Bradshaw once said, “If you only get one great love, New York may just be mine”. When I first saw this book I was instantly intrigued. Some of my fondest memories from my freshman year of college occurred on St. Marks Place. I wanted to learn the deep history behind a street that meant so much to me. The book walks through the colonization of New York City and how the neighborhood changes throughout the decades. It includes personal stories from residents of the street, making the book personal and real. If you love the history of music, art, or New York City, then I highly recommend picking this book up. It even includes vintage photographs!

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Weapons of Math Destruction by Cathy O’Neil-

Some of you may have just read that title and cringed. Ew, math!? Why would I want to read about math? Personally, I love math, but you do not have to enjoy crunching numbers to appreciate this book. O’Neil dives deep into how today’s algorithms favor the wealthy and hurt the middle class. She touches on subjects like college admission and bank loans, describing how these systems work against the typical American. The book is definitely eye-opening; It makes you think how it is even possible to escape this embedded discrimination.

The Black Swan by Nassim Nicholas Taleb-

This book has to be my least favorite of all I read during January. I have had this book for quite awhile, maybe two years. Every time I reached to read it I ended up returning it to the growing stack of books in my bedroom. Taleb is a philosopher by nature so the entire book is quite lyrical, making it one big tangent and hard to follow. While there were chapters that really made me wonder how the world works, and reflect on my own experiences, I found myself lost for quite a majority of it. Also, I may have been a bit bitter that he kept stating the uselessness of statistics, a subject I quite enjoy!

The Rise of the Robots by Martin Ford-

I have a large fascination with robots being that I want to pursue data science in the future. I was initially attracted to this book by the bright, animated cover. Whoever said “don’t judge a book by its cover” clearly never walked around a bookstore filled with the most beautiful books. This book goes into a detailed discussion about how technology is projected to ruin our economical system. Ford dives into each upcoming innovation and how that particular one will destroy opportunities for the middle class. He then provides what he believes to be a solution for the accelerated pace of technology. If you love technology as much as I do, and are amazed by what scientists are creating in the world, give this book a read!

If you have any recommendations on books you think I should read, please leave them below! Look out for February’s Reads, coming soon.